business catalog article new catalog business opportunities finance catalog deposites money catalog making art loan catalog deposits making catalog your home good income catalog outcome issue medicine catalog drugs market catalog money trends self catalog roof repairing market catalog online secure catalog skin tools wedding catalog jewellery newspaper catalog for magazine geo catalog places business catalog design Car catalog and Jips production catalog business ladies catalog cosmetics sector sport catalog and fat burn vat catalog insurance price fitness catalog catalog furniture catalog at home which catalog insurance firms new catalog devoloping technology healthy catalog nutrition dress catalog up company catalog income insurance catalog and life dream catalog home create catalog new business individual catalog loan form cooking catalog ingredients which catalog firms is good choosing catalog most efficient business comment catalog on goods technology catalog business secret catalog of business company catalog redirects credits catalog in business guide catalog for business cheap catalog insurance tips selling catalog abroad protein catalog diets improve catalog your home security catalog importance

March 2016 Archives

In short, the new study by Wood and Douglas suggests that the negative stereotype of the conspiracy theorist - a hostile fanatic wedded to the truth of his own fringe theory - accurately describes the people who defend the official account of 9/11, not those who dispute it. Press TV Fri Jul 12, 2013 4:3AM GMT By Dr. Kevin Barrett Recent studies by psychologists and social scientists in the US and UK suggest that contrary to mainstream media stereotypes, those labeled "conspiracy theorists" appear to be saner than those who accept the official versions of contested events. truth of his own fringe theory - accurately describes the people who defend the official account of 9/11, not those who dispute it. Additionally, the study found that so-called conspiracists discuss historical context (such as viewing the JFK assassination as a precedent for 9/11) more than anti-conspiracists. It also found that the so-called conspiracists do not like to be called "conspiracists" or "conspiracy theorists." Both of these findings are amplified in the new book Conspiracy Theory in America by political scientist Lance deHaven-Smith, published earlier this year by the University of Texas Press. Professor deHaven-Smith explains why people don't like being called "conspiracy theorists": The term was invented and put into wide circulation by the CIA to smear and defame people questioning the JFK assassination! "The CIA's campaign to popularize the term 'conspiracy theory' and make conspiracy belief a target of ridicule and hostility must be credited, unfortunately, with being one of the most successful propaganda initiatives of all time." In other words, people who use the terms "conspiracy theory" and "conspiracy theorist" as an insult are doing so as the result of a well-documented, undisputed, historically-real conspiracy by the CIA to cover up the JFK assassination. That campaign, by the way, was completely illegal, and the CIA officers involved were criminals; the CIA is barred from all domestic activities, yet routinely breaks the law to conduct domestic operations ranging from propaganda to assassinations. DeHaven-Smith also explains why those who doubt official explanations of high crimes are eager to discuss historical context. He points out that a very large number of conspiracy claims have turned out to be true, and that there appear to be strong relationships between many as-yet-unsolved "state crimes against democracy." An obvious example is the link between the JFK and RFK assassinations, which both paved the way for presidencies that continued the Vietnam War. According to DeHaven-Smith, we should always discuss the "Kennedy assassinations" in the plural, because the two killings appear to have been aspects of the same larger crime. Psychologist Laurie Manwell of the University of Guelph agrees that the CIA-designed "conspiracy theory" label impedes cognitive function. She points out, in an article published in American Behavioral Scientist (2010), that anti-conspiracy people are unable to think clearly about such apparent state crimes against democracy as 9/11 due to their inability to process information that conflicts with pre-existing belief. In the same issue of ABS, University of Buffalo professor Steven Hoffman adds that anti-conspiracy people are typically prey to strong "confirmation bias" - that is, they seek out information that confirms their pre-existing beliefs, while using irrational mechanisms (such as the "conspiracy theory" label) to avoid conflicting information. The extreme irrationality of those who attack "conspiracy theories" has been ably exposed by Communications.

About this Archive

This page is an archive of entries from March 2016 listed from newest to oldest.

February 2016 is the previous archive.

April 2016 is the next archive.

Find recent content on the main index or look in the archives to find all content.